Tom Brokaw allegedly made unwanted advances toward multiple women at NBC - MRCAESAR.COM

Thursday, 26 April 2018

Tom Brokaw allegedly made unwanted advances toward multiple women at NBC


NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Two women claim that legendary anchor Tom Brokaw propositioned them when they worked at NBC.
Two women claim that legendary anchor Tom Brokaw made unwanted advances toward them when they worked at NBC.
Linda Vester, a former NBC correspondent, told the Washington Post that Brokaw, now 78, propositioned her when she was in her 20s; he was 30 years her senior.
Vester claims that Brokaw invited her for a drink when she was in New York on assignment in 1994; she says she responded that she only drinks milk and cookies.
"It was the only thing I could think of at the time, hoping the reference to milk and cookies would make him realize I was 30 years his junior and not interested," she told the Washington Post.
Stuck in the city because of a snow storm, Vester said Brokaw called her and told her that he was coming over, according to her diary, obtained by the Post.
The married Brokaw allegedly told Vester that he was looking for "an affair of more than passing affection."
Two women claim legendary NBC anchor Tom Brokaw made unwanted advances when they worked at the network in the 1990s. (Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)
"Now let me show you how to give a real kiss," she claims he said from the sofa in the hotel room.
After she resisted, Brokaw allegedly left. The next day, Vester said, he tried to paint their evening as consensual.
She also claims he made additional advances a year later in London, but she again rejected him.
Brokaw denied Vester's allegations.
"I met with Linda Vester on two occasions, both at her request, 23 years ago, because she wanted advice with respect to her career at NBC," he said in a statement to the Washington Post.
Tom Brokaw, a longtime and prominent NBC anchor, made unwanted advances toward two women when they worked at NBC. Linda Vester, a former NBC correspondent, says that Brokaw approached her two times in the 1990's. Brokaw denied any misconduct. "I met with Linda Vester on two occasions, both at her request, 23 years ago, because she wanted advice with respect to her career at NBC," said Brokaw in a statement released by NBC. "The meetings were brief, cordial and appropriate, and despite Linda's allegations, I made no romantic overtures towards her, at that time or any other." (Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images for Meet the Press)
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"The meetings were brief, cordial and appropriate, and despite Linda's allegations, I made no romantic overtures towards her, at that time or any other."
Another woman, who worked as a production assistant in the mid-1990s when she was 24, claims that Brokaw approached her during the winter and, after telling her that her hands were cold, "put my hands under his jacket and against his chest and pulled me in so close and asked me, 'How is your job search going?'"
She told the Washington Post that he then invited her back to his office after his show. She did not go.
Neither woman reported the alleged assaults.
Brokaw, who left "Nightly News" in December 2004, continued on as a special correspondent at the peacock network before serving as interim host of "Meet the Press" after Tim Russert's death in 2008.
Linda Vester, a former NBC correspondent, claims he tried to kiss her and told her that he was looking for “an affair of more than passing affection.” (Michael Buckner/Getty Images)
NBC did not immediately return a request for comment.
The allegations made against Brokaw follow Matt Lauer's firing in November amid multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.
Ann Curry, who worked on "Today" for 15 years, including as Lauer's co-anchor in 2011 and 2012, told the Washington Post that there was "pervasive verbal sexual harassment at NBC" while she was there.
She claims she told NBC management that another female staffer had been "sexually harassed physically" by Lauer, but the network told the Post that there was no record of her warning.
Lauer, meanwhile, made his first public comments since he was fired, again denying the allegations.
"I have made no public comments on the many false stories from anonymous or biased sources that have been reported about me over these past several months. I remained silent in an attempt to protect my family from further embarrassment and to restore a small degree of the privacy they have lost," he said in a statement to The Washington Post.
"But defending my family now requires me to speak up. I fully acknowledge that I acted inappropriately as a husband, father and principal at NBC. However I want to make it perfectly clear that any allegations or reports of coercive, aggressive or abusive actions on my part, at any time, are absolutely false."

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